Is this hard for you too?

Today I’m talking about a little exercise called self-restraint. I am a shopper, even when I’m not shopping, I’m thinking about what I want to wear now or next season. I do this for everyone: my friends, my mom, my son, sometimes people I hardly know but are paying me to tell them. But really, it’s more than that. My ultimate goal is to curate a timeless personal wardrobe of unique and beautiful items – the getting there has become a bit more difficult: non-stop sales, one-time capsule collections, and new designers are popping up regularly (and reminding you in your inbox!). It’s hard to keep scrolling or keep walking when you see a pair of highly covetable Saint Laurent boots a staggering 60% off. So much of this turns into impulse buying and can disrupt any continuity or thematic structure within our closets, in turn upending our personal style.

It would be super easy to just blame the system – too much product. While this is maybe partly true, I think it’s more of a function of our fast-paced culture constantly craving something new, anything new. We have found more hours in our day to do more things than ever before, multi tasking at insane levels. I’m not to say how this impacts actual quality productivity – but we have trained ourselves to exist at this level, so I believe it is possible to train ourselves to appreciate the amount of product without participating (i.e. buying stuff we’ll never wear just because it exists).

One may argue this is purely an act of self-control, but I would counter that in order to feel one is fully part of any specific pop culture moment, (whether it’s SS16 or the Pablo merch), one must literally buy into it. Considering how many hours we spend on social media, FOMO is a real thing for many of my peers and colleagues. I’m going to consciously try to take back my unconscious state of always looking for something new – please join me if you too slowly see a pile of unworn, and interesting, but not-your-style items growing in your personal wardrobe, and are committed to learning the art of appreciation vs participation.

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