Photo Courtesy Felicity Brown
Interview

FELICITY BROWN

11.30.11

Felicity Brown launched her namesake womenswear collection in 2010 during London Fashion Week with her brother Henry. She is a graduate of the Royal College of Arts and has honed her skills designing for Alberta Ferretti, Mulberry and Lanvin.  Felicity has also created a diffusion collection called No.23 that features printed t-shirts and separates. The company has offices both in London and Dubai.

Interview

What did you take most from your past experiences working with Alberta Ferretti and Lanvin?

Alberta Ferretti gave me the freedom to create and work using a totally organic process. Lanvin gave me the concept of rawness, showing me that when something is unfinished it can be perfectly finished.

The collection includes lots of hand dying and fabric layering. Are those signature details?

Yes. My work is always with textile structure, with the manipulation of fabrics. I use old, artisanal hand dyeing and hand printing techniques.

Since the launch in 2010, the collection has been picked up by Barneys and received a lot of press in US publications. You recently showcased the collection at the London Showroom in New York. What are some other US retailers you are hoping to work with?

Linda Dresner, Blake in Chicago and Barneys. Buyers have been very drawn to the separates for Spring 2012. In addition, 20% of my business is bespoke.

The collection currently sells in 11 countries, which has the greatest following?

The UK and the Middle East.

Why do you think that is?

That’s where our roots are. We have studios in each of these countries.  We’re also part of NewGen, which is part of the British Fashion Council, who have given us a lot of support.

That’s what I love the most about being a designer in the UK, the support network and assistance for young designers.

Do you feel you design differently for customers in the UK vs. other countries?

No. My philosophy is to create and fulfill my own vision.

Is there a place for menswear in the collection in the future?

No, I don’t think so. I think my work is too feminine and theatrical.

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