Photo Courtesy Daphne and Vera Correll
Interview

DAPHNE & VERA CORRELL

02.11.13

Twin sisters Daphne and Vera Correll are the designing duo behind Correll Correll, a line of handmade knitwear that was launched in 2006 in Berlin. The now New York based pair creates handmade textiles and specializes in dyeing, weaving and knitting with natural textures. The Corrells have worked with showrooms such as Opening Ceremony, Showroom Romeo in Paris, and Zenyia in Tokyo, and in 2012 went on to win the Ecco Domani Fashion Foundation award in women’s design.

Interview

Hailing from Berlin, what made you decide to reside in New York as opposed to London or Paris?

I love New York, I don’t always know why. I think we mostly came here for personal reasons. We both love to travel, and New York always seemed to satisfy that feeling of restlessness of wanting to see the rest of the world.

How has your business changed since winning Ecco Domani last year?

It was a huge honor for us to win that award. It definitely helped us to take our business to the next level. We have always wanted to do a show, so this was a great opportunity. We have gained a lot more visibility since winning the Ecco Domani. It was a great year for us.

Do you think not having a background in fashion allows you to take more risks with design and fabric choices?

I think it does allow us to take more risks. We like working with fabrics and materials in unconventional ways. Sometimes we invent techniques that don’t require the mastering of a craft, but are more intuitive. There is some liberty in not always striving for perfection. We welcome mistakes in our process; it often leads to new ideas.

From a very early age, we were always creating with whatever materials we could get our hands on. As kids, we learned crocheting, knitting, pottery, weaving, sewing and other crafts. That background in different traditional crafts and both of us having studied fine art greatly influences our work process now.

Does producing everything in-house cause certain challenges?

We hand produce a lot of the designs in our studio in the Lower East Side. We also work with local knitters and seamstresses and some factories in the garment center.

Each garment is either completely done by us or will go through our hands many times in the production process, for example, to be hand dyed, embroidered or knitted. The challenges are mainly needing more space and needing more assistants. It is a very labor intense process, but it’s also something we both really enjoy.

Your collections sell in carefully curated stores such as Creatures of Comfort, Assembly, Jumelle and Journal Standard. How does this reflect your customer?

Our customer cares. They love wearing things that aren’t mass-produced and reflect something more personal. We sell to a lot of artists and creative types, but I think our clothes are accessible to many.

What’s it like working with your twin sister? Do you each have a specialized skill in the design process?

We complement each other pretty well. Daphne does the unisex collection and most of the knits and Vera does most of the woven work and the women’s collection. 

Daphne likes things to be more geometric and Vera more organic. Vera likes contrasts and Daphne likes monochromes. It works, but like in any other collaboration, there is a lot of discussion; it’s a process.

What are your plans for Fall 2013? Will you do a show or a presentation?

We are doing shows once a year, so the next time you will see us at NYFW is in September. Right now, we are finishing our FW13 collection for the showroom. And we are also working on a designer collaboration with Anthropologie’s Made In Kind that will be for sale soon.

2 Comments

  1. Jennifer Barringhaus responded:

    Very interesting interview. The idea of bringing the warmth of handmade textiles to the big city….a change from "mass produced" items is wonderful…..kind of gives New York that "small town" feel. Great job with the interview. I enjoy reading these, and I especially like the touch of the photograph.

  2. Jennifer Barringhaus responded:

    Very interesting interview. The idea of bringing the warmth of handmade textiles to the big city….a change from "mass produced" items is wonderful…..kind of gives New York that "small town" feel. Great job with the interview. I enjoy reading these, and I especially like the touch of the photograph.

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